Level 2 Latin Internal Assessment Resource

Level 2 Latin Internal Assessment Resource

Internal assessment resource Latin 2.5B v2 for Achievement Standard 91198

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Internal Assessment Resource

Latin Level 2

This resource supports assessment against:
Achievement Standard 91198 version 2
Interpret Latin in current use
Resource title: Immortality
3 credits
This resource:
  • Clarifies the requirements of the standard
  • Supports good assessment practice
  • Should be subjected to the school’s usual assessment quality assurance process
  • Should be modified to make the context relevant to students in their school environment and ensure that submitted evidence is authentic

Date version published by Ministry of Education / February 2015 Version 2
To support internal assessment from 2015
Quality assurance status / These materials have been quality assured by NZQA.
NZQA Approved number: A-A-02-2015-91198-02-5566
Authenticity of evidence / Teachers must manage authenticity for any assessment from a public source, because students may have access to the assessment schedule or student exemplar material.
Using this assessment resource without modification may mean that students’ work is not authentic. The teacher may need to change figures, measurements or data sources or set a different context or topic to be investigated or a different text to read or perform.

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Internal assessment resource Latin 2.5B v2 for Achievement Standard 91198

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Internal Assessment Resource

Achievement Standard Latin 91198: Interpret Latin in current use

Resource reference: Latin 2.5B v2

Resource title: Immortality

Credits: 3

Teacher guidelines

The following guidelines are designed to ensure that teachers can carry out valid and consistent assessment using this internal assessment resource.

Teachers need to be very familiar with the outcome being assessed by the Achievement Standard Latin 91198. The achievement criteria and the explanatory notes contain information, definitions, and requirements that are crucial when interpreting the standard and assessing students against it.

Context/setting

This assessment activity requires students to interpret Latin in current use. They will examine the image of Daedalus and Icarus in the arts and its links from the past to today. The activity is based on Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Book 8, lines 183–235.

You can modify this assessment activity to focus on other images or ideas contained in Roman stories, or images of Roman gods and goddesses with reference to Latin text(s), instead of Ovid’s Daedalus and Icarus. Examples include:

  • Lucretia
  • Galatea and Pygmalion
  • Cupid
  • Castor and Pollux
  • the Labryinth
  • the eagle.

If you select a different context, modify the student instructions, conditions, and assessment schedule accordingly.

Students will present a piece of written work that explains the links between three artworks inspired by the story of Daedalus and Icarus and today. The artworks must be from three different writers, painters, sculptors, musicians, film-makers, or choreographers, and must include at least two different media (for example, one sculpture and two paintings). The works may have been copied, adapted, or created in past centuries or in current times.

To ensure that there is enough material to work with and that not too many comments are repeated, you may need to guide the students towards appropriate works; for example, you could supply a list of possible works.

Students’ work should best reflect their ability to use linguistic and cultural knowledge to interpret Latin in current use. Students should fully expand on selected points. Latin references/quotations should have an English explanation, and Latin evidence (or reference to Roman socio-cultural contexts) should be appropriate and unambiguous. Students must acknowledge all sources of information in a bibliography. This is for authentication purposes and is not assessed.

Conditions

Students will work individually over the period of one term. This allows time for students to read Latin sources and collect sufficient evidence.

Resource requirements

  • Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Book 8, lines 183–235 in Latin
  • Students may use classroom notes and material from libraries, the media, and the Internet
  • A useful site on the myth and its connections to art is:

Additional information

None.

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Internal assessment resource Latin 2.5B v2 for Achievement Standard 91198

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Internal Assessment Resource

Achievement Standard Latin 91198: Interpret Latin in current use

Resource reference: Latin 2.5B v2

Resource title: Immortality

Credits: 3

Achievement / Achievement with Merit / Achievement with Excellence
Interpret Latin in current use. / Interpret Latin in current use clearly. / Interpret Latin in current use thoroughly.

Student instructions

Introduction

This assessment activity requires you to interpret Latin in current use. You will use your linguistic and cultural understanding of Latin to extract and explain the meanings and significance of images and ideas and how they link from the past to the present. You will present your work as an article to be published in a Latin journal.

You have been reading Ovid’s story of Daedalus and Icarus (Metamorphoses, Book 8, lines 183–235), which will help you to complete this assessment activity.

You may also use your classroom notes and material from libraries, the media, and the Internet. List all of your sources of information in a bibliography. Your bibliography is not assessed but will be used for authentication purposes.

This activity will take place over one term during in- and out-of-class time. Hand your work to your teacher on the due date.

Preparatory activity: Select three artworks

  1. Find three artworks that were inspired by the story of Daedalus and Icarus. The artworks must be from three different writers, painters, sculptors, musicians, film-makers, or choreographers. They must include at least two different media (for example, one sculpture and two paintings). You may select works that have been copied, adapted, or created in past centuries or in current times.
  2. If you have selected a painting, mural, mosaic, poem, or short story: photocopy the work. If you have selected an opera, play, film, or dance: write a synopsis.
  3. For each work, provide the title, name of the artist, and date of origin.

Task: Prepare your article

For each work, identify and explain a range of common features that it shares with the story of Daedalus and Icarus. Reflect on these features and include in your answer a possible reason or reasons for them.

For example, you might consider the following features:

  • characters
  • relationships between characters
  • tragic elements
  • story
  • moral or message.

For quality written work, remember to:

  • fully expand on particular points
  • give appropriate and unambiguous Latin evidence
  • give line references for Latin quoted from the text and explain the quotation in English.

Remember that you are presenting your written work as an article for a Latin journal. Give your article a title and a subheading.

Resources

  • Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Book VIII, lines 183–235.
  • Classroom notes and material from the internet, media or libraries.

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Internal assessment resource Latin 2.5B v2 for Achievement Standard 91198

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Assessment schedule: Latin 91198 Immortality

Evidence/Judgements for Achievement / Evidence/Judgements for Achievement with Merit / Evidence/Judgements for Achievement with Excellence
The student has interpreted Latin in current use. The student has:
  • used knowledge of language and of linguistic and socio-cultural contexts with the support of resources to extract and explain the meaning and significance of the Latin ideas from reading Ovid’s story of Daedalus and Icarus and how they link from the past to today
  • explained how these ideas have been used by artists over the centuries since Roman times.
An example of an extract from a student response.
The same characters from Ovid’s story appear in Bruegel’s painting.
Each person is using (or leaning on) a work tool: the fisherman is catching fish with a quivering rod, the shepherd is leaning on his staff, and the ploughman is leaning on his plough-handle.
In Ovid’s story, they all look up at Icarus and Daedalus flying overhead. However in Bruegel’s painting only the ploughman is looking up at Icarus.
Maybe Bruegel is suggesting that the use to which Daedalus had put his hands compared to the practical purposes of the shepherd’s and ploughman’s is unnatural and risky. Daedalus is trying to change the laws of nature with hishands, which results in his son’s death. / The student has interpreted clearly Latin in current use. The student has:
  • used knowledge of language and of linguistic and socio-cultural contexts with the support of resources to extract and explain the meaning and significance of the Latin ideas from reading Ovid’s story of Daedalus and Icarus and how they link from the past to today
  • explained how these ideas have been used by artists over the centuries since Roman times
  • expanded on particular points selected in the explanation.
An example of an extract from a student response.
Pieter Bruegel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, painted around 1558, is based on the same story of Daedalus and Icarus.
The same characters from Ovid’s story appear in Bruegel’s painting: the fisherman, shepherd, and ploughman.
Each person is using (or leaning on) a work tool: the fisherman is catching fish with a quivering rod, the shepherd is leaning on his staff, and the ploughman is leaning on his plough-handle.
In Ovid’s story, they all look up at Icarus and Daedalus flying overhead. However in Bruegel’s painting only the ploughman is looking up while Icarus falls into the sea behind him. Maybe Bruegel is suggesting that the use to which Daedalus had put his hands compared to the practical purposes of the shepherd’s and ploughman’s is unnatural and risky. Arrogance comes before a fall. Daedalus is trying to change the laws of nature which results in his son’s death. This arrogance is emphasised by the humility of the characters, who, in contrast are working usefully with their hands. / The student has interpreted thoroughly Latin in current use. The student has:
  • used knowledge of language and of linguistic and socio-cultural contexts with the support of resources to extract and explain the meaning and significance of the Latin ideas from reading Ovid’s story of Daedalus and Icarus and how they link from the past to today
  • explained how these ideas have been used by artists over the centuries since Roman times
  • fully expanded on particular points selected in the explanation
  • supported answers with appropriate and unambiguous Latin references / quotations from the text
  • given an English explanation of the Latin evidence.
An example of an extract from a student response.
Pieter Bruegel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, painted around 1558, continues the ancient Roman tradition of visualising literary text. For instance the same story of Daedalus and Icarus can be seen in a Pompeian wall painting at the House of the Priest Amandus in Pompeii.
The same characters from Ovid’s story (lines 217–218) appear in Bruegel’s painting: the fisherman with his rod (harundine pisces), the shepherd (pastor) and the ploughman (arator). Each person is using (or leaning on) a work tool: the fisherman is catching fish with a quivering rod (maybe he has a fish?), the shepherd is leaning on his staff, and the ploughman is leaning on his plough-handle.
hos aliquis, tremula dum captat harundine pisces, aut pastor baculo stivave innixus arator.
In Ovid’s story, these three characters all look up at Icarus and Daedalus flying overhead. However in Bruegel’s painting, only the ploughman is looking up while Icarus falls into the sea behind him. Maybe Bruegel is suggesting that life goes on despite tragedy, or that the use to which Daedalus had put his hands compared to the practical purposes of the shepherd’s and ploughman’s is unnatural and risky. In Bruegel’s painting, Icarus’s hands are invisible beneath the water and are of no use to him, unlike the fisherman’s, shepherd’s, and ploughman’s hands. Arrogance comes before a fall. Daedalus is trying to change the laws of nature naturamque novat (line 189), which results in his son’s death.
The arrogance of Daedalus (and Icarus) is emphasised by the humility of the characters, who, by contrast, are working usefully with their hands.

Final grades will be decided using professional judgement based on a holistic examination of the evidence provided against the criteria in the Achievement Standard.

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