Khost a Socio-Economic and Demographic Profile

Khost a Socio-Economic and Demographic Profile

Khost
A Socio-Economic and Demographic
Profile
With the financial and technical assistance of UNFPA Note
Some of the information contained in this report, in particular that related to crops and economic activities, as well as the building stock may not be as accurate as one would wish. However, they are the best estimates available at the time of the Household listing exercise. The most logical explanation is that the sources of the information—local informants—may not have been as knowledgeable as they were assumed to be. Province of Khost
A Socio-Economic and Demographic Profile
Household Listing—2004 Acknowledgements
The Socio-Economic and Demographic Profiles were a collaborative effort of UNFPA, the Central Statistics Office, and numerous stakeholders, who made suggestions for the improvement of the final product while it was still being written.
UNFPA wishes to recognize the contributions of Mr. David Saunders, its former representative in Afghanistan, who shared the various drafts of the model Profile with a number of donors, embassies, and other stakeholders stationed in Kabul and collected their suggestions as to how to improve on it.
The profiles could not have been completed without the commitment, enthusiasm and energetic efforts of many CSO staff members. Mr. M ohammad Haroon Aman, M r.
Waheed Ibrahimi, and Mrs Fazila Miri of the Database section produced all the tables and graphics for all 34 provinces. Mr. Tamim Ahmad Shakeb, head of the GIS section, and his colleagues, Messrs Zabiullah Aseel and Abdul Ahmad Sherzai, together produced all the thematic maps included in the body of the text as well as in the annexes—a total of more than 1,300 maps. Messrs Nasratullah Ramzi, Saifrahman Azizi, Sayed Yousuf
Hashimi, and Zabiullah Omari of Database section were responsible for editing the profiles and putting the last touches before printing.
UNFPA also wishes to extend its appreciation to Mr. Abdul Rashid Fakhri, head of CSO, and his colleagues in the CSO review team—Messrs Esmatuallah Ramzi, Mohamed Sami
Nabi, Azizullah Faqiri, and Ghulam Mustapha, who read the drafts and made valuable comments and suggestions, in particular with regards to the information on economic activities.
-iii- Introduction by the Acting General President of the Central Statistics Office of Afghanistan
Designing programs aimed at increasing socio-economic development and economic growth to ensure better living conditions for population requires accurate, up-to-date, and comprehensive data. It has been 27 years since Afghanistan’s first attempt to conduct a national population census. For reasons known to all, such an attempt had to be aborted.
In those 27 years, a number of changes took place, that were related to natural population growth, population movement, and redrawing of the boundaries of the country’s administrative units, among others. Such changes need to be apprised and documented, in order to respond to the need for accurate information that is vital for development and reconstruction programs.
Both the Bonn agreement and the emergency Loya Jirga called for the conduct of a second national population and housing census. Jointly with UNFPA, CSO mobilized the required funds from the international donor community, and took charge of the complex task of planning for the census and upgrading the technical skills of the CSO staff that will be responsible for its conduct.
In spite of difficulties of various sorts, and at an enormous cost in terms of staff mobilization, CSO, with the financial and technical assistance of UNFPA, undertook the first phase of the population and housing census. The operation, including door numbering, household listing, updating the enumeration area maps, data entry, cleaning, and processing took less than four years. For the first time, digital maps were produced for all provinces, districts, and village locations.
CSO has the great pleasure of producing this publication, which presents the results of the first phase of the census. It provides such valuable information as population size and spatial distribution, age and sex composition, as well availability of certain facilities to the village populations. We hope that such information will be useful for the widest audience, in particular planners, researchers, and any one with an interest in population data.
Abdul Rashid Fakhri,
Acting General President
Central Statistics Office,
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.
-iv- Introduction by the Representative of UNFPA
Under the Bonn Agreement, the United Nations agreed to assist the Government of Afghanistan in conducting a Population and Housing Census, the first Census in
Afghanistan since 1979. As a leader in population and development issues, the United
Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has been entrusted with this task for its decades of experience and expertise in providing technical and financial assistance in conducting population and housingcensuses.
For the past few years, Afghanistan has been making serious attempts at rebuilding and rehabilitating the nation and its institutions after more than two decades of war, conflict, and civil strife. Effective planning for comprehensive social and economic development requires evidence based and reliable data. Data for economic and social development can come from various sources: sample surveys, administrative records, and various other sources. However, no data source other than a Population and Housing Census will provide primary information about the number and characteristics of Afghanistan’s population. Likewise, the Census 2008 will allow for comprehensive gender analysis of population based indicators and will provide the baseline for population and any related functional projections that are crucial for planning.
The present publication deals with Phase I of the Afghanistan census—the Household
Listing, conducted and the results analyzed between 2002 and 2005. The data collected during this exercise provides a wealth of information on basic population variables in the country — size of the population, age structure and sex composition, and household size.
The household listing has also produced much socio-economic data on economic activities, health and education facilities, housing facilities and so on. All such information will be essential in the process of socio-economic reconstruction in
Afghanistan. However, it must be noted that the household listing phase unfortunately could not be conducted in a small number of districts due to the security situation that prevailed then. It is hoped that the census proper, scheduled for the summer 2008 and being a benchmark under the London Compact, will encounter more favorable circumstances and fill the gaps left by the Household Listing exercise. UNFPA will extend all possible assistance to the Government of Afghanistan in order to make the census operation in 2008 a successful one. There are a number of positive aspects, which are important to note in the context of conducting the household listing, particularly noteworthy is the cooperation, which the Central Statistical Office has received from the Provincial Administrations, and the assistance, which has been extended to the CSO staff in all of the provinces. The enthusiasm of all of the staff to undertake very difficult work in exceptionally difficult conditions is equally noteworthy and appreciated, as is the quality of the work. At this point, I would like to extend my gratitude and recognition to
Dr. Hamadi Betbout, UNFPA’s senior advisor who led the exercise of managing the household listing database and publication of the provincial profiles.
Alain Sibenaler
Representative a.i.
UNFPA Kabul
-v-

Khost
-vi- Contents
Acknowledgments................................................................................................................. iii
Introduction by the Acting General President of the Central Statistics Office .................................... iv
Introduction by the Representative of UNFPA............................................................................ vMap of Khost ....................................................................................................................... vi
Settlement patterns................................................................................................................ 1
Demographic characteristics.................................................................................................... 8
Age distribution.............................................................................................................. 8
Household size and sex ratio............................................................................................. 11
Special age groups.......................................................................................................... 11
Main languages spoken.................................................................................................... 12
Living conditions.................................................................................................................. 14
Educational services........................................................................................................ 15
Health services ............................................................................................................... 17
Post offices and public phones........................................................................................... 17
Mills............................................................................................................................. 17
Radio Television.......................................................................................................... 19
Economic activities ............................................................................................................... 28
Agriculture .................................................................................................................... 28
Industrial crops, smallindustries, and handicrafts................................................................. 30
Physical socialinfrastructure............................................................................................... 33
Housing units................................................................................................................. 33
Schools and educational institutions................................................................................... 34
Health infrastructure....................................................................................................... 34
Factories and workshops.................................................................................................. 35
Bakeries and mills........................................................................................................... 36
Hotels and restaurants..................................................................................................... 36
Shopping places ............................................................................................................. 37
Mosques........................................................................................................................ 37
Other places................................................................................................................... 38
Annexes ............................................................................................................................... 44
Annex 1— Population Estimates asof 1 July 2004, by province..................................................... 45
Annex 2—Total and urban populations (as of mid-July 2004) by province, ranked according to their percent with respect to their shares of the total urban population ofAfghanistan......................... 46
Annex 3— Total and urbanpopulations(as of mid-July 2004) by province, ranked according to their percent with respect to their shares of the total urban population ofAfghanistan......................... 47
Annex 4— Procedure for adjusting the reported age distribution.................................................... 48
Annex 5—Comparison of the reported and adjusted age distributions, Khost, 2004............................ 49
Annex 6—Compositional analysis—economic activities, Khost, 2004.............................................. 50
Annex 7—Villages producing wheat, Khost, 2004........................................................................ 68
Annex 8—Villages producing corn, Khost, 2004.......................................................................... 69
Annex 9—Villages producing rice, Khost, 2004........................................................................... 70
Annex 10—Villages producing potatoes, Khost, 2004................................................................... 71
Annex 11—Villages producing onion, Khost, 2004....................................................................... 72
Annex 12—Villages producing tomatoes, Khost, 2004.................................................................. 73
Annex 13—Villages producing carrots, Khost, 2004..................................................................... 74
Annex 14—Villages producing grapes, Khost, 2004..................................................................... 75
Annex 15—Villages producing melon water melon, Khost, 2004................................................. 76
Annex 16—Villages producing walnuts, Khost, 2004.................................................................... 77
Annex 17—Villages producing licorice, Khost, 2004.................................................................... 78
-vii- Annex 18—Villages producing eggs, Khost, 2004........................................................................ 79
Annex 19—Villages producing dried yoghurt, Khost, 2004............................................................ 80
Annex 20—Villages producing cotton, Khost, 2004...................................................................... 81
Annex 21—Villages producing sesame, Khost, 2004..................................................................... 82
Annex 22—Villages producing olives, Khost, 2004...................................................................... 83
Annex 23—Villages producing sharsham, Khost, 2004................................................................. 84
Annex 24—Villages producing honey, Khost, 2004...................................................................... 85
Annex 25—Villages producing karakul skin, Khost, 2004.............................................................. 86
Annex 26—Villages producing carpets, Khost, 2004.................................................................... 87
Annex 27—Villages producing rugs, Khost, 2004........................................................................ 88
Annex 28—Villages producing pottery, Khost, 2004..................................................................... 89
Annex 29—Villages producing wool, Khost, 2004........................................................................ 90
-viii- Tables
Table 1—Population, sex, sex ratios, by district, Khost, 2004........................................................ 2
Table 2—Reported population estimates by age in 5-year groups and sex, Khost, 2004....................... 9
Table 3—Adjusted population estimates by age in 5-year groups and sex, Khost, 2004....................... 10
Table 4—Special age groups by sex, in absolute numbers and percents, Khost, 2004.......................... 12
Table 5—Agricultural and industrial products, handicrafts and small industries, Khost, 2004............... 28
Table 6—Number of buildings, and population per building, by type, Khost, 2004............................ 41
-ix- Figures
Figure 2—Distribution of the population settlements by size-class, Khost, 2004................................ 5
Figure 1—Population Settlements............................................................................................ 4
Figure 3—Population pyramid, Khost, 2004—Reported ............................................................... 9
Figure 4—Population pyramid, Khost, 2004—Adjusted ............................................................... 10
Figure 5—sex ratio, by district, Khost, 2004............................................................................... 11
Figure 6—Population by villages, bymain languages spoken, Khost, 2004...................................... 12
Figure 7—Population and villages, by distance from the district center, Khost, 2004.......................... 14
Figure 8—Population and villages, by topography of the village, Khost, 2004.................................. 16
Figure 9—Population and villages, by type of road, Khost, 2004.................................................... 16
Figure 10—Population and villages by distance from certain facilities, Khost, 2004........................... 18
Figure 11—Population living in villages where there are radios or TVs, Khost, 2004......................... 19
Figure 12—Population by source ofirrigation water, Khost, 2004.................................................. 31
Figure 13—Economic activities, Khost, 2004............................................................................. 32
Figure 14—Physical infrastructure, Khost, 2004......................................................................... 42
-x- Maps
Map 1—Rural settlements by Size –Class, Khost, 2004................................................................ 7
Map 2—Villages by Main language spoken, Khost, 2004............................................................. 13
Map 3—Topoghraphy of Khost, 2004....................................................................................... 20
Map 4—Villages accessibility by Road, Khost, 2004 .................................................................. 21
Map 5—Villages with primary schools, Khost, 2004.................................................................... 22
Map 6—Villages with secondary schools, Khost, 2004................................................................. 23
Map 7—Villages with Highschools, Khost, 2004........................................................................ 24
Map 8—Health infrastructure –Health centers, Dispensaries, and Drugstores, Khost, 2004.................. 25
Map 9—Villages with Post offices and/or public phones, Khost, 2004............................................. 26
Map 10—Villages with Mills, Khost, 2004................................................................................ 27
-xi- Settlement
Patterns
Located in the South-Eastern region, Khost is bordered by the provinces of Paktya in the North and North-East, and Paktika, in the South-West. It covers a land area of 4,235 squared kilometers, representing 0.65 percent of the total Afghan territory. The province is divided into 13 districts—the provincial center, Khost, Ali Sher, Baak, Jaji Maidan,
Sabari (Yacubi), Musa Khel, Qalandar, Nadirshah Kot, Manduzay (Esmayel Khel),
Shamul, Spera, Tanay, and Gurbuz.
Khost is home to 2.8 percent of the total population of Afghanistan. With its 638,849 th inhabitants, it is the 14 most populous province in the country (see Annex1).
The population of Khost is distributed among the 13 districts as shown in table 1 and figur e 11. The most populous districts are the provincial center, Khost, Sabari (Yacoubi),
Tanay, and Manduzay (Esmayel Khel), with respectively 25.1 percent, 14.1 percent, 10.5 percent and 9.7 percent. Together these four districts account for about three-fifthslf of the total population in the province.
1 Figure 1 is comprised of two panels; in addition to panel A which shows the distributionof the population by district, panel B shows the population density of each district. The latter information was included for conventional purposes only, as in the absence of quantified information on proportion ofinhabitable land, density figures can be very misleading. Panel B shouldtherefore be interpreted with caution.
- 1 - Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
The large majority of the population—97.6%—lives in rural areas. Khost, the provincial capital and only urban2 center, houses a mere 15,162 population, which represents 0.33 percent of the total urban population of Afghanistan.
Table 1—Population, sex, and sex ratio, by district, province of Khost, 20043.
Total
Provincial Center―Khost 160,214 25.08 81,284 78,930 102.98
Ali Sher 47,650 7.46 24,632 23,018 107.01
District Number Percent Males Females Sex ratio
4.33 Baak 27,675 14,065 13,610 103.34
3.63 Jaji Maidan 23,197 12,015 11,182 107.45
14.05 Sabari (Yaqubi) 89,779 45,701 44,078 103.68
6.57 Musa Khel 41,998 21,382 20,616 103.72
1.79 Qalandar 11,406 6,006 5,400 111.22
Nadirshah Kot 37,193 106.56 5.82 19,187 18,006
Manduzay (Esmayel Khel ) 61,682 106.60 9.66 31,826 29,856
2.12 Shamul 13,523 107.79 7,015 6,508
Spera 4.18 13,886 26,685 108.49 12,799
10.50 Tanay 33,976 67,096 102.58 33,120
Gurbuz 4.81 15,907 30,751 107.16 14,844
Total 100.00 326,882 638,849 104.78 311,967
The rural population of Khost—623,882 inhabitants— is distributed over 868 settlements of varying sizes. The smallest settlement counts as few as 4 people and the largest as many as 8,5934.
Figure 2 shows the distribution of the village population by size-class in the total province (panel A) and in each individual district (panel B).
At the province level, the most remarkable feature of the distribution is the dominance of large-sizes villages, which reminds one of the distribution of Parwan and Kapisa. Out of the 868 villages, 194, representing more a fifth, have populations of 1000 or more.
Compared to the other end of the distribution, i.e., villages with less than 100 population, the ratio is close to 3, i.e., for every villages with 100 population or less there are 3 with
1,000 or more.
2
Urbanity in Afghanistan is not based on population size. According to the Ministry of the Interior, are considered urban those places whose administrative structures include a municipality, regardless of their population sizes. In the case of Afghanistan all provincial capitals are urban, with the exception of Panjsher and Nooristan, as well as the capitals of some districts.
3 Enumeration started 6 May 2004 and ended on 15 June of the same year.
4 Unlike the majority of the other provinces, Khost has no villages withzero population.
- 2 - Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
The distributions by district are shown in panel B of figure 2. It shows that of the 13 districts, more than half share with the province a whole the characteristic regarding the proportion of large-sized villages. Such proportion ranges from 16 percent in Tanay to close to half in Sabari (Yaqubi). It is also worth noting that the predominance of villages of very small sizes seen in such other provinces as Wardak, for instance, does not show in any of the remaining districts.
- 3 -

Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
Figure 1—Population settlement, Khost, 2004
A— Percent district Populationw ith respect to prov incial total
B—Density: population per km2
- 4 - Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
A—Province
= 100 0
194
900− 99 9
27
800− 89 9
45
45
700− 79 9
600− 69 9
56
61
500− 59 9
400− 49 9
67
300− 39 9
106
91
200− 29 9
100− 19 9
111
10 0
65
050 100 150 200 250
Number of Villages
B—Districts
Provincial Center—Khost Ali Sher
46 18
³1 00 0 ³1000
900-999 900-999
800-899 800-899
700-799 700-799
600-699 600-699
500-599 500-599
400-499 400-499
300-399 300-399
200-299 200-299
100-199 100-199
100 100
53
14 1
11 8
85
13 6
11 3
23 3
10 3
12 9
55
010 20 30 40 50 04812 16 20
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
Baak Jaji Maidan
³1 00 0 ³1000
900-999 900-999
800-899 800-899
700-799 700-799
600-699 600-699
500-599 500-599
400-499 400-499
300-399 300-399
200-299 200-299
100-199 100-199
100 100
11 3
20
20
23
32
15
29
17
412
317
117
3015 020 6912 4812 16
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
Sabari (Yaqubi) Musa Khel
³1 00 0 = 1000
900-999 900-999
800-899 800-899
700-799 700-799
600-699 600-699
500-599 500-599
400-499 400-499
300-399 300-399
200-299 200-299
100-199 100-199
100 =100
31 9
42
36
74
33
25
28
613
315
210
08
5035 020 10 15 20 25 30 4812 16
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
- 5 - Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
Figure 2 (Cont'd)—Distribution of the rural population settlements by size-class, Khost, 2004
Qalandar Nadirshah Kot
= 1000 = 1000
700-799 700-799
300-399 300-399
=100 =100
413
1900-999 900-999 4
2800-899 800-899 4
03
2600-699 600-699 0
0500-599 500-599 1
1400-499 400-499 4
38
1200-299 200-299 3
6100-199 100-199 3
22
0246810 036912 15
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
Manduzay (Esmayel Khel ) Shamul
23 3
= 1000 = 1000
700-799 700-799
300-399 300-399
=100 =100
3900-999 900-999 0
4800-899 800-899 1
82
3600-699 600-699 4
9500-599 500-599 2
4400-499 400-499 1
43
4200-299 200-299 3
3100-199 100-199 6
10
0510 15 20 25 0246810
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
Spera Tanay
700-799 700-799
600-699 600-699
500-599 500-599
400-499 400-499
300-399 300-399
200-299 200-299
100-199 100-199
=100 =100
= 1000 6= 1000 18
1900-999 900-999 2
2800-899 800-899 4
35
44
55
712
517
12 13
11 19
616
016 36912 15 04812 20
Num ber of Vi llages Number of Villages
Gurbuz
=100
= 1000 9
900-999 0
700-799 0
800-899 2
600-699 4
500-599 7
400-499 3
300-399 13
200-299 8
100-199 10
2
036912 15
Num ber of Vi llages
- 6 - Provincial Profile—Khost Settlement Patterns
Map1
- 7 - Demographic
Characteristics
Age distribution
The distribution by age and sex of the population of Khost is shown in table 2 and figure
3. As the latter clearly shows, the distribution is highly irregular. The overall shape of the age-pyramid is typical of a pre-transition society—characterized by stable high fertility, but certain age groups are noticeably below the expected size. For instance, it is not readily understandable why the proportion of males of the 0-4 age group is so close to the proportion of the 5-9 of the same sex, or should be that much lower than the proportion of males of the 5-9 age group, or why should the females of the 5-9 age group or the males of the 1-14 age group be much larger than one would expect. Whereas a deficit in the proportion of children below 5 could be a direct result of war casualties—women married to soldiers having given birth to fewer children than in normal circumstances, it is difficult to account for the sex-selectiveness of such deficit.
Clearly, the age data need to be adjusted before they can be used for planning purposes.
“Errors in the tabulated data on age may arise from three different sources:
•inadequate coverage,
•failure torecord age, and •misreporting of age.
Coverage errors are of two types. Individuals of a given age may have been missed by the census or erroneously included in it (e.g. counted twice). The first type of coverage error represents gross under-enumeration at this age and the second gross-over-enumeration. The balance of the two
1types of coverage errors represents net under-enumeration at this age .”
1 Because under-enumeration commonly exceeds over-enumeration; the balance is typically designated as under-enumeration.
- 8 - Provincial Profile—Khost Demographic Characteristics
“In addition, the ages of some individuals included in the census may not have been reported, or may have been erroneously reported by the respondent, erroneously estimated by the enumerator, or erroneously allocated by the census office. Such errors are referred toas response bias”.
2
Table 2—Population estimate, by agein 5-year groups and sex, Khost, 2004 —Reported
Male Female Both sexes
Percent Percent Age Group Number Number Number Percent
54,148 0-4 16.60 19.10 59,646 113,794 17.80
9-May 50,530 15.50 19.30 60,055 110,585 17.30
10-14 50,943 15.60 11.70 36,401 87,344 13.70
15-19 39,693 12.10 9.20 28,568 68,261 10.70
11.10 20-24 24,127 7.40 34,696 58,823 9.20
25-29 26,338 25,949 52,287 8.30 8.10 8.20
30-34 20,963 18,473 39,436 6.40 5.90 6.20
35-39 16,962 14,702 31,664 5.20 4.70 5.00
40-44 13,222 12,116 25,338 4.00 3.90 4.00
45-49 11,829 7,983 19,812 3.60 2.60 3.10
50-54 7,670 5,011 12,681 2.30 1.60 2.00
55-59 3,928 7,056 3,128 1.00 1.30 1.10
60-64 2,361 3,339 1.00 0.80 5,700 0.90
65-69 1,308 2,066 0.60 0.40 3,374 0.50
70-74 585 1,369 0.40 0.20 1,954 0.30
75-79 287 0.10 185 0.10 472 0.10
80+ 268 0.10 00.00 268 0.00
Total 326,882 100.00 311,967 100.00 638,849 100.00
Figure 3—Population pyramid, Khost, 2004—Reported
80+
0..100
00.110
75-79
70-74
0.40 0.20
65-69 0.60
60-64 1.00
0.40
0.80
55-59
1.00 1.30
1.60
4.70
50-54 2.30
3.60 2.60
4.00 3.90
6.40 5.90
Males
45-49
40-44
Females
35-39 5.20
30-34
25-29 8.10
20-24 7.40
8.30
9.20
11.10
11.70
15-19
12.10
10-14 15.60
5-9
0-4
15.50 19.30
19.10
16.60
Correction of the age distribution of the 2004 household listing poses certain challenges.
In addition to the difficulties described above, one must take into account two additional factors:
2
The age distribution isbased on 1/200 sample of the total households.
- 9 - Provincial Profile—Khost Demographic Characteristics
1. excess mortality amongcertain age groups due war, and 2. the waves of war refugees that left for neighboring countries.
It follows that, in any attempt to correct for the anomalies, care must be taken not to remove the true fluctuations that resulted from such factors.
To correct for these irregularities, we applied a multi-stage procedure3 that yielded the distribution shown in table 3 and figure 44.
Table 3—Adjusted population estimate, byage in 5-year groups and sex, Khost, 2004
Male Female Both sexes
Percent Percent Age Group Number Number Number Percent
62,100 0-4 19.00 19.15 59,743 121,842 19.07
9-May 52,291 16.00 16.13 50,328 102,618 16.06
10-14 43,037 13.17 13.26 41,370 84,407 13.21
15-19 36,353 11.12 11.19 34,903 71,256 11.15
20-24 28,335 8.67 10.37 32,361 60,696 9.50
6.98 25-29 22,823 8.81 27,487 50,310 7.88
30-34 20,840 18,574 39,414 6.38 6.17 5.95
35-39 17,605 14,165 31,770 5.39 4.54 4.97
40-44 14,445 11,373 25,818 4.42 3.65 4.04
45-49 10,949 8,462 19,411 3.35 2.71 3.04
50-54 6,531 11,834 2.00 1.70 1.85 5,303
55-59 7,934 4,415 1.35 3,518 1.13 1.24
60-64 3,284 1.00 2,265 0.73 5,550 0.87
65-69 2,195 0.67 1,355 0.43 3,550 0.56
70+ 1,679 0.51 760 0.24 2,439 0.38
Total 326,882 100.00 311,967 100.00 638,849 100.00
Figure 4—Population pyramid, Khost, 2004—Adjusted.
70+
0.51 0.24
0.67 0.43
65-69
60-64
55-59
50-54
1.00 0.73
1.35 1.13
2.00 1.70
4.42 3.65
45-49 3.35 2.71
40-44
Males
Females
35-39 5.39 4.54
30-34 6.38 5.95
25-29
6.98 8.81
20-24 8.67 10.37
15-19
11.12 11.19
10-14 13.17 13.26
5-9 16.00 16.13
0-4 19.00 19.15
Household size andsex ratio
3 The complete account of the various stages is shownin Annex 2.
4 For a comparison of the reported and adjusted age-distribution, see annex 3.
- 10 -

Provincial Profile—Khost Demographic Characteristics
The sex ratio (number of males per 100 females) varies between 102.6 in Tanay and 111.2 in Qalandar, the provincial average being 104.8 (figure 5 below and the last column of table 1). No information is available that could explain why it is so in
Qalandar.
Figure 5. Sex ratio, bydistrict, Khost,2004
A typical household in Khost has 7.1persons, which is higher than the national average of 6.3. Such a size is an indicator of a high fertility regime.
Special age groups
Planners attach special interest to certain age groups. For fertility analysis for instance, the total number of women 15 to 49 years of age—the childbearing ages—is more significant than others. The population 6 to 12—primary school ages—is important in educational research and planning. Table 4 presents data for the above age groups as well as for others, based on an interpolation of the adjusted five-year age distribution5.