Graduate Employment

Graduate Employment

Graduate Employment

First Destinations Report

UL Graduates 2010

Careers Service

Cooperative Education & Careers Division

1

First Destinations Report, UL Graduates 2006

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS

3OVERVIEW OF SURVEY RESULTS: Primary Degree Graduates

3.1First Destinations of 2010 Graduates: All Faculties

3.2Employment Sectors: All Faculties

3.3Salaries: All Faculties

3.4Location of Employment: All Faculties

3.5ALL PRIMARY DEGREES

Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Sociology

Bachelor of Arts in English and History

Bachelor of Arts in European Studies

Bachelor of Arts in History Politics Sociology and Social Studies

Bachelor of Arts in International Insurance and European Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Irish Music and Dance

Bachelor of Arts in Irish and New Media

Bachelor of Arts in Law and Accounting

Bachelor of Arts in Language and Cultural Studies

Bachelor of Arts in New Media and English

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology

Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration

Bachelor of Business Studies with French

Bachelor of Business Studies

Bachelor of Engineering in Aeronautical Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Biomedical Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering in Robotics Engineering

Bachelor of Laws (Graduate Entry)

Bachelor of Laws in Law and European Studies

Bachelor of Engineering Science (With Minor Option)

Bachelor of Architecture

Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical and Advanced Materials

Bachelor of Science in Construction Management and Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Computer Systems

Bachelor of Science in Digital Media Design

Bachelor of Science in Economics and Mathematical Sciences

Bachelor of Science (Education) in Biological Science

Bachelor of Science (Education) Physical Science

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science

Bachelor of Science in Equine Science

Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics

Bachelor of Science Food Science and Health

Bachelor of Science in Health and Safety

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Biochemistry

Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Systems

Bachelor of Science in Multimedia and Computer Games Development

Bachelor of Science in Midwifery

Bachelor of Science in Music, Media and Performance Technology

Bachelor of Science in Mathematical Sciences

Bachelor of Science Nursing (General)

Bachelor of Science Nursing (Intellectual Disability)

Bachelor of Science Nursing (Mental Health)

Bachelor of Science in Product Design and Technology

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education

Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacuetical and Industrial Chemistry

Bachelor of Science in Production Management

Bachelor of Science in Sport and Exercise Science

Bachelor of Science in Wood Science and Technology

Bachelor of Technology (Education) in Materials and Construction Technology

Bachelor of Technology (Education) in Materials and Engineering Technology

Other Primary Degree Courses*

4POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS

5MASTERS DEGREES - TAUGHT

6MASTERS DEGREES – RESEARCH - TOTAL

7PhD TOTAL

PhD AWARDS - Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

PhD AWARDS - Faculty of Education & Health Sciences

PhD AWARDS - Kemmy Business School

PhD AWARDS - Faculty of Science & Engineering

8CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS

1

First Destinations Report, UL Graduates 2010

1EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This year marks the 30th edition of the report on the First Destinations survey of University of Limerick graduates. This survey is conducted every year by the Cooperative Education & Careers Division as part of a nation-wide survey, on behalf of the Higher Education Authority. The survey report reflectsthe status of UL graduates nine months after graduation, providing accurate and comprehensive information on employment and further study patterns. It also provides details of the employment sectors, regions of employment, and salary levels. This exercise has generated valuable data on graduate employment trends over a long period of varying levels of economic and social development. This information is of benefit to students, university management, employers, policy makers and all with an interest in higher education.

Over the past two years, the employment prospects of all Irish graduates have been adversely affected by the continuing recession, as many employers cancelled their graduate recruitment plans or reduced their graduate intake. The impact on the graduates of 2009 was very severe, resulting in the highest graduate unemployment experienced since the 1980s, as reported in the First Destinations survey report published last year. Although there is still widespread concern about job losses in the Irish economy, the results of the most recent survey of UL graduates are much more encouraging showing an overall increase of 7% in the employment record of the total UL graduating class of 2010.

There has also been a significant increase in the level of graduate recruitment activities on campus in the past year as employers target UL graduates because of their academic ability and the employability skills developed through their Cooperative Education and Teaching Practice experience. This is reflected in the recent international QS Star Ratings which awarded UL a 5-Star rating for Graduate Employability, on the basis of the ‘work-readiness’ of graduates, employer recommendations, and the careers support available to students.

The survey of the graduates of 2010 was conducted in April 2011 and the results reflect the employment and further study pattern of 80% of the 2,500 graduates who completed full-time programmes of study in UL during 2010. The survey covers all award levels, up to and including PhDs.

The key features of the survey findings for the different award levels are as follows:

Primary Degrees

  • 58% of graduates went directly into employment, 45% in Ireland and 13% overseas. This is a 5% increase in employment levels on the previous year. It is not possible to make comparisons with the national employment level of graduates as that data is not yet available from the HEA but the employment record of UL graduates has always been consistently higher than the national average.
  • The percentage of graduates finding employment in both Ireland and overseas increased in the past year, from 41% to 45%, and from 12% to 13% respectively. This is encouraging and demonstrates the employability of UL graduates even in a recessionary climate.
  • There was a decrease in the number of graduates opting for further study or research, from 32% to 27%. This may be attributed to the general decline in disposable incomes in Irish households which makes postgraduate course fees unaffordable for many.
  • There was a 1% increase to 5% in the percentage who were 'not available' for employment or further study. There has been very little variation in this percentage over the past five years, ranging from 4% to 6%.
  • The results record a decrease of 1% in the number of graduates seeking employment which is now 10%. This is lower than the official labour market unemployment figure which is currently in excess of 14.4%.
  • There has been no significant change in the salary levels for new graduates in the past year. The results record an average starting salary of approximately €24,400 with more than 27% of respondents earning salaries in excess of €29,000.
  • Once again, the public sector accounts for the highest concentration of graduate jobs, particularly Education at 26% down 4% on last year, and Health at 14% up 1% on last year. Despite the continuing problems encountered in the financial services sector, the Business, Finance and Insurance sectors between them accounted for the second highest proportion of graduates, 22% which is 2% lower than last year.
  • The Mid-West continues to be the most popular region of employment, accounting for 31% of jobs, followed by Dublin, at 30%. The most popular overseas location was the UK at 39%, followed by the Middle East at 24%.
  • The overall employment rate for Education graduates increased by 3% to 82%, which is exceptionally strong considering that only 13% are teaching overseas. The number seeking employment is also significantly lower than average, at only 7%.

Higher Degrees

  • The survey results record a significant improvement in the employment rates across the majority of postgraduate programmes, demonstrating the value of investing in further study as a means of improving employment prospects.
  • More than three quarters of those who completed Postgraduate Diplomas in 2010 found employment. Of the 76% employed, the vast majority are working in Ireland with only 9% working abroad.
  • A total of 657 graduates completed Masters Degrees in 2010 and 72% went directly into employment, 13% of these overseas. Some 9% continued with their studies primarily to PhD level.
  • The highest employment rate was recorded by PhD graduates with 94% employed, an increase of 11% on the previous year. PhD graduates are also more likely to seek research opportunities overseas, and 19% are working outside of Ireland.
  • Salary levels increase in accordance with level of qualification and, for those with postgraduate qualifications, average salaries range from €28,000 to €48,500, depending on type of qualification, sector of employment and nature of job.

For further information, contact the Careers Service, Cooperative Education & Careers Division at .

2GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS

Employment trends over time: UL Graduates 2000-2010

This chart reflects the ebbs and flows in the Irish economy over the past decade as the employment rate of UL graduates ranged from a peak of 74% in 2007 to a nadir of 53% in 2009. The drop in employment is counterbalanced by a rise in postgraduate study, from 18% to 32% over the same period. Similar trends are evident in the percentage of graduates seeking employment, ranging from a low of 2% to a high of 11%. The most recent survey reports a drop in the number of graduates seeking employment to 10% which is significantly lower than the national unemployment rate, currently in excess of 14.4%.

Employment by degree discipline: UL graduates 2010

In the past year, there has been a noticeable improvement in graduate employment levels across all degree disciplines. This chart highlights the variation in employment patterns across degree disciplines, with the highest employment rate recorded by graduates in Education & Health Sciences graduates who have completed professional programmes. These courses are traditionally associated with high employment, and have maintained this record despite recruitment embargoes in the public sector which accounts for the majority of jobs for these graduates.

The employment rate of Business graduates increased from 56% to 61%, and this is largely attributed to a return to the high recruitment pattern of the large accounting firms. There was a corresponding drop of 6% in the number of Business graduates opting for postgraduate study, from 29% to 23%.

Postgraduate study has always been a popular option for graduates in the Arts, Humanities & Social Science disciplines. This is clearly reflected in the most recent statistics which show the number of graduates in further study outweigh those in employment by 3%. This attraction to further study is also a characteristic of Science & Engineeringgraduates with almost one third opting for postgraduate study or research activities.

Employment by award level: UL graduates 2010

The value of postgraduate study is clearly evident from this chart which shows an improvement in employment in line with qualification levels. The higher the qualification award, the more likely graduates are to enter the labour market and the less likely they are to continue to further study. PhD graduates recorded an exceptionally high employment rate of 94% and this reflects an increase in research and development activities in some of the key graduate employers in Ireland, both multinationals and indigenous companies. This group also shows the highest rate of graduates working overseas as many are attracted by academic posts in international research institutes or universities.

Employment by genderacross all award levels: UL graduates 2010

Female graduates outnumber male graduates by 52% to 48% and record a higher employment rate of 65% against 63%. The survey results show that they are also more likely to continue to further study and are less likely to be seeking employment or be unavailable for employment. This trend has been evident in previous survey reports and may be due to the higher presence of female students in the Education & Health Sciences programmes, which also record the highest employment rates. There is no direct evidence of a gender bias in recruitment patterns. In fact, it is more likely that the degree discipline has a stronger influence on employment prospects than the gender of graduates.

Salary levels by award: UL graduates 2010

It is no surprise that there is a positive correlation between graduate starting salaries and level of award, as demonstrated in this chart. The above chart displays only salary ranges up to €41,000. It is important to note however, that a significant number of research masters and PhD graduates are on salaries well above this level but it has not been possible to display this accurately in the above composite chart as it would skew the overall distribution acrossother award levels. The distribution of salary levels for these two cohorts can be found in section 7 of this report. Salary levels increase in accordance with the level of qualification, with average salaries ranging from €24,400 for a primary degree graduate to €44,200 for PhD graduates.

It is difficult to make accurate assumptions based on the salary data as only 59% of respondents have declared salary details. Also, the survey records only the starting salaries for graduates and cannot reflect any differences that might arise at a later stage in the graduates’ careers. It is likely that many of the differences in salary levels can be accounted for by degree discipline, level of award, type of employer or location of employer. These are evident in the more detailed sets of charts provided in section 3.5 of this report.

3OVERVIEW OF SURVEY RESULTS: Primary Degree Graduates

3.1First Destinations of 2010 Graduates: All Faculties

The total number of Primary Degree graduates in 2010 exceeded 1,600, of whom over 82% are accounted for in the survey results. The pattern of first destinations for this cohort of graduates is as follows:

  • After two successive years of declining employment rates, this year’s results show a reversal in this trend as many employers return to previous levels of graduate recruitment. This is reflected in an increase of 5% in the employment rate of UL graduates of 2010, from 53% to 58%. The percentage employed in Ireland has increased by 4% to 41%.
  • There has been a very slight increase in the number of graduates finding work overseas, from 12% to 13%. Although this is the highest level in this decade, it is significantly lower than the high levels experienced during the 1980s.
  • There has been a significant decrease in the number of graduates opting for further study or research, down 5% from last year to its current level of 27%. This may be attributed to the general decline in disposable incomes in Irish households which makes postgraduate course fees unaffordable for many.
  • The percentage of graduates who were not available for employment or further study increased by 1% from last year.
  • There was a decrease of 1% in the number of graduates seeking employment which is now 10%. This is well below the official labour market unemployment level which is currently at 14.4%.

Note: Detailed information on each of the individual degree courses is presented in section 3.5.

3.2Employment Sectors: All Faculties

The sectoral distribution of graduate jobs varies greatly across the different degree disciplines, as reflected in the course charts on the following pages. Only the larger sectors are highlighted in this commentary. The overall trends for all Primary degree graduates are as follows:

  • The dominance of the public sector is again evident from the survey results, accounting for 41% of graduate jobs, down 3% from last year. Foremost is the Education sector at 26%, down4% on last year, whereas the Health sector showed an increase of 1%, and the Civil Service remains static at 1%. The highest employment rate was recorded by Nursing with some of the specialist programmes recording95% employed in relevant roles.
  • The combined Business, Finance and Insurance sectors remain strong, accounting for the second highest proportion of graduates at 22%. A further analysis of this group shows that approximately 42% are employed in accountancy and legal services and 39% are employed in banking, finance and insurance with the remainder employed in other related sectors.
  • The Manufacturing sector remains consistent with the previous year, accounting for only 11% of jobs. The ICT and Telecommunications sector has increased by 1% to 5% but has capacity for a much higher intake of graduates. This sector is suffering from the current shortage of graduates in computing disciplines which has been a feature of higher education in recent years.

3.3Salaries: All Faculties

Salary data applies only to graduates employed in Ireland. This chart relates to over 59% of graduates who declared their salary levels.

  • Following two years of declining salary levels, this year’s survey results indicate that graduate salaries have stabilised. The average starting salary for UL graduates in 2010 was €24,500, considerably lower than the average salary of €28,000 which was recorded three years ago.
  • There was an increase in the number of graduates at the higher end of the salary scale, with 27% of respondents reporting salaries in excess of €29,000by comparison with 24% last year. This was offset by a similar increase in the number of graduates at the lower end of the salary scale, with 22% on salaries below €17,000 by comparison with 19% last year.
  • 11% of graduates are on the lowest salary band, earning salaries of less than €12,999. This might be because of part-time work or possibly because of the impact of the unpaid or lowly paid graduate internship programmes introduced by the government as a job creation measure.
  • The average salary for male graduates was €25,200 by comparison with €23,600 for female graduates. This is a significant difference but cannot be directly attributed to gender bias. On the whole, salary levels are more likely to be influenced by factors such as degree discipline, type of job, sector of employment or location of employment.
  • Detailed salary information is presented in the individual course tables in the next section of this report.

3.4Location of Employment: All Faculties