Foundation Degree in Tourism Management

Foundation Degree in Tourism Management

UNIVERSITY OF KENT

Module Specification

1. Title of the Module

Heritage and Maritime Tourism (CB348)

2. School

Mid Kent College, Travel Tourism and Customer Service

3. Start Date

September 2004

4. Number of students expected to take the module

10

5. Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with other relevant schools and faculties regarding the withdrawal

Not applicable – New Qualification

6. Level of the Module

Certificate (FHEQ level: 4)

7. Number of Credits

15

8. Term the module will be taught in

Year 1 – Term 2

9. Prerequisite and co-requisite modules

Tourism Specialist - Tourism

10. The programmes of study to which the module contributes

The Foundation Degree in Tourism Management

11. The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship

to programme learning outcomes

Subject Specific Learning Outcomes / Related Programme Learning Outcomes
1. / Analyse the nature and characteristics of the heritage tourism and maritime tourism product / Demonstrate an understanding of:
A2 - the products, structure of, and interactions in the tourism industry
A4 – the nature and characteristics of tourists
A8 – markets, customers, contemporary and persuasive issues
B9,10,11,12,15 C17,18,19
2. / Investigate the structure of the heritage tourism and maritime tourism industries. / Demonstrate an understanding of:
A2 - the products, structure of, and interactions in the tourism industry
A3 – the role of tourism in the environments that it affects
A5 – organisations, the external environments in which they operate
A7 – the economic, environmental, ethical, legal, political, sociological and technical external environment
B9,11,12,15 C17,18,19,20
3. / Explain the key issues affecting the heritage tourism industry and the maritime tourism industry / Demonstrate an understanding of:
A1 – the concepts and characteristics of tourism as an area of academic and applied study
A2 - the products, structure of, and interactions in the tourism industry
A3 – the role of tourism in the environments that it affects
A5 – organisations, the external environments in which they operate
A7 – the economic, environmental, ethical, legal, political, sociological and technical external environment
A8 – contemporary
B9,10,11,12,13,14,15 C16,17,18,19,20
4. / Evaluate the use of interpretation in designated heritage & maritime attractions / Demonstrate an understanding of:
A2 - the products, structure of, and interactions in the tourism industry
A5 – organisations, the external environments in which they operate and how they are managed
A6 – The processes, procedures and practices for the effective management of organisations
A8 – markets, customers, information systems, communication and IT
B9,10,11,12,13,14,15 C16,17,18,19,20

12. The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to

programme learning outcomes.

Generic Learning Outcomes
“On completion of this module students should have developed: / Related Programme Learning Outcomes
1. / Analytical skills / B12,14 and D24
2. / An ability to research using a wide range of industry relevant sources / B9,11, C19, and D22
3. / An ability to critically evaluate practice in the heritage and maritime tourism industry / B10&14, C18&19, D24&25
4. / An ability to verbally present information in a manner suitable to a business environment / B12&14, D21
5. / An ability to interact professionally with all the constituent parts of the industry / B15, C17,18,20, and D23
6. / Ability to plan and manage their own time to meet deadlines / B15 and D26

13. A synopsis of the curriculum

Outcome / Content
1. / The nature and characteristics of the heritage tourism and maritime tourism product
Definitions of heritage and maritime tourism
  • Natural – landscape, coastlines and beaches, water including natural harbours, inlets and lakes, national parks, forests, woodlands, wildlife, and other habitats
  • Built Heritage
Purpose built for tourism – museums, transport, sports venues, themed
sites, marinas
Adapted for tourism – castles and historic buildings, artifacts, archaeological
sites, industrial heritage including water based industry, harbours and dockyards
  • Cultural Heritage – Local distinctiveness including gastronomic tourism, the role of heritage in shaping and sustaining cultural identity, regatta’s and festivals, and impact of all heritage on the local community’s perception of identity, and ‘popular cultural heritage’ e.g. James Bond country (KTA)

2. / The structure of the heritage tourism and maritime tourism industries.
  • Scope of heritage and maritime tourism – education, research, recreation, entertainment
  • Ownership – public, private and voluntary sectors. Partnerships
  • Local public involvement e.g. Parish, City and District Councils
  • Regional public involvement e.g. County Councils.
  • Government Agencies e.g. English Heritage, Cadw, Historic Scotland. Government Departments e.g. DCMS
  • QUANGO’s e.g. The Civic Trust, Environment Agency, the Countryside Agency, the National Parks, Wildlife Trusts
  • National organisations e.g. National Trust.
  • International organisations e.g. European Union, World Heritage Sites
  • Collaboration e.g. Kent Tourism Alliance
The roles and responsibilities of the organisations involved including:
  • Funding
  • Advisory e.g. health and safety, handling of artifacts, skills training
  • Legislative
  • Change management e.g. new technologies, interpretation management,

3. / The key issues affecting the heritage tourism industry and the maritime tourism industry
  • Conservation and Access
  • Impacts of tourism
  • Interpretation
  • Education
  • Market – segmentation and targeting, visitor levels – demand and supply
  • Planning and land use - Brown field sites vs Green field sites
  • Developments in technology
  • Sustainability
  • Pollution and deterioration of natural water resources
  • Responsible tourism
  • Impacts of European Capital of Culture bids
  • Urban and Seaside regeneration

4. / Interpretation in heritage/maritime attractions
  • Media e.g. published material, audio-visual, interactive, reenactment and role-play, audio and other sensory techniques.
  • Identification of different audience information needs and meeting those needs through interpretation. The need for variety of media to enable differentiation.
  • Language – levels of understanding e.g. children and adult, and main European languages
  • Theming and authenticity

14. Indicative Reading List

Market Reports & Surveys
English Heritage (2003) Heritage Counts 2003: State of England's historic environment, London: English Heritage
MarketScape (2002) Heritage Tourism , London: MarketScape Ltd
English Tourism Council (2001) The Heritage Monitor 2000/2001 , London: English Tourism Council

General Texts
Selwood, S (2001) The UK cultural sector: Profile and policy issues , London: Policy Studies Institute
Drummond, S & Yeoman, I (2000) Quality issues in heritage attractions , Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann
Uzzell, D & Ballyantyne, R (1998) Contemporary issues in heritage and environmental interpretation , London: Stationery Office
Casey, B, Dunlop, R & Selwood, S (1996) Culture as commodity? the economics of the arts and built heritage in the UK , London: Policy Studies Institute
Herbert, DT (Ed) (1995) Heritage, tourism & society , London: Pinter
Yale, P (1991) From tourist attractions to heritage tourism , Huntingdon: ELM Publications

Heritage Management

Boniface, P (1995) Managing quality cultural tourism , London: Routledge

Boniface, P & Flower, PJ (1993) Heritage and tourism in 'The global village' , London: Routledge

English Historic Towns Forum & English Tourist Board (1994) Getting it right: a guide to visitor management in historic towns , London: English Historic Towns Forum

Harrison, R (Ed) (1994) Manual of heritage management , Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Leask, A & Yeoman, I (eds) (1999) Heritage visitor attractions: an operations management perspective , London:

Cassell
Shackley, M (1998) Visitor management: case studies for world heritage sites , Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Tunbridge, JE & Ashworth, GJ (1996) Dissonant heritage: the management of the past as a resource in conflict , Chichester: Wiley
World Wide Web

15. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of the intended learning outcomes

Work Related and/or Work Based Experience for evaluating methods of interpretation, Individual and Group Work, Case studies, Guest Speakers, Heritage and Maritime Tourism Attraction visits

Subject-specific Learning Outcome 1 – 3 All except work related/based methods

Subject-specific Learning Outcome 4 – All methods

Nature and number of Contact Hours / 36 hours combining Lecture and Seminar and visits to attractions
Total Study Hours / 150 which includes self directed study, visits to attractions and work related and/or work based experience
Number of hours allocated to the achievement of each learning outcome
(Directed hours) / Subject-specific Learning Outcome 1 - 9 hours
Subject-specific Learning Outcome 2 - 6 hours
Subject-specific Learning Outcome 3 - 9 hours
Subject-specific Learning Outcome 4 - 12 hours

16. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended

learning outcomes

Generic Outcomes / Learning Outcome / Assessment Methods
1,2,4,6 / 1. / In class time constrained assignment
“Analyse the nature and characteristics of the heritage and maritime tourism industries and evaluate their contribution to the tourism industry as a whole.”
1,2,6 / 2. / A handbook on the structure of the heritage and maritime tourism industries and the role of the organisations involved
1,2,3,4,5,6 / 3. / A presentation on the key issues affecting the heritage tourism industry and the maritime tourism industry
1,2,6 / 4. / Written evaluations of the effectiveness of the interpretation in 5 heritage attractions to include a minimum of 2 maritime tourism attractions

17. Resource requirements e.g. staff, library, IT and space

Access to the University of Kent Internet based journals

Existing Mid Kent College and University of Kent library provision (although this will need to be expanded to include maritime tourism related material from the Indicative Reading List)

Staffing will be covered by existing Mid Kent College Lecturers

Access to the Internet and Word Processing facilities at Mid Kent College

Sufficient classroom space to co-teach with HND students

18.As far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities.

Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching:

“I confirm I have been consulted on the above module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of module proposals.”

………………………………………………….…………………………………….

Director of Learning and TeachingDate

Statement by the Head of School:

“I confirm that the School has approved the introduction of the module and will

be responsible for its resourcing”

...... …………………………………….

Head of SchoolDate

1